How to Make Infused Water

 

You can infuse water with any number of herbs, spices, edible flowers, fruit and even vegetables! Here are some ideas:

  • Herbs: Rosemary, thyme, mint, basil, cilantro, parsley
  • Spices: Cinnamon sticks, cardamom pods, fresh ginger, cloves, vanilla bean
  • Edible flowers: Rose, lavender, citrus blossoms, hibiscus, pansies, violets (or any that are 100% pesticide free)
  • Fruit: Berries (fresh or frozen), melon, tropical fruits, citrus, apples, pears
  • Vegetables: Cucumber, celery, fennel, carrots

·         Water: Filtered water is great, but if you don’t have a filtration system, tap water is fine too

Be patient

Let the water sit for a few hours to allow the flavors to infuse. The longer it sits, the more flavorful the water will be. Some fruits or herbs will infuse more quickly than others. Citrus is pretty instant. Herbs take a little longer. Berries take a few hours and will also release color into the water. I put the infused water in the fridge immediately after I make it, but it doesn’t hurt to let it sit at room temperature for a little while. However, you should keep it in the fridge or put ice in it if you aren’t planning on using it right away.

Drink + refill

Pour a glass and enjoy! You can refill the water a few times and let it infuse again, but the flavors won’t be as pronounced.

 

10 more tasty infused water ideas

  1. Orange Chai Spice: sliced oranges, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, allspice
  2. Vanilla Basil Strawberry: vanilla bean (remove seeds first), handful fresh basil, 1 cup sliced strawberries
  3. Fennel Pear: thinly sliced fennel bulb plus a few green fronds, thin slices ripe, but firm pear
  4. Basil Melon: sliced or cubed melon, handful basil leaves
  5. Ginger Lime: sliced fresh ginger, sliced limes
  6. Blueberry Cucumber Basil: handful fresh blueberries, sliced cucumber, handful basil
  7. Lemon Lavender: slices of lemon, a few teaspoons lavender (tie in cheesecloth)
  8. Raspberry Rose: handful of raspberries, organic fresh rose petals
  9. Mango Pineapple Mint: sliced of firm-ripe mango, slices of pineapple, handful fresh mint
  10. Apple Cinnamon: slices green or red apple, a few cinnamon sticks

 

 

Image result for How to Make Infused Water

 

 

  1. Cucumber Mint (shown in the image above) – one of my favorites. Fresh mint goes well with any fruit, the taste is so refreshing!
  2. Strawberry Cucumber
  3. Lemon Strawberry
  4. Cucumber Lemon Mint
  5. Lemon Mint
  6. Apple Cucumber
  7. Apple Strawberry Lemon Mint
  8. Strawberry Mint
  9. Grapefruit Lemon Orange Lime – A delicious citrus infusion.
  10. Grapefruit Lemon – (Shown in the image below)
  11. Blackberry Sage
  12. Blueberry Lemon
  13. Raspberry Lime
  14. Raspberry Peach
  15. Raspberry Mint
  16. Orange Mint
  17. Blackberry Lime
  18. Mango Orange
  19. Blood Orange Mango
  20. Kiwi Strawberry
  21. Kiwi Lime
  22. Papaya Lime
  23. Papaya Orange
  24. Orange Strawberry
  25. Grape Lemon
  26. Ginger Lemon
  27. Ginger Mint
  28. Pineapple Orange
  29. Pineapple Strawberry
  30. Pineapple Blueberry
  31. Pineapple Mint
  32. Pineapple Sage
  33. Cantaloupe Mint
  34. Honeydew Melon Mint
  35. Cucumber Melon
  36. Watermelon Raspberry
  37. Watermelon Rosemary
  38. Lemon Lime
  39. Apple Lemon
  40. Mango Strawberry

Add any of these fresh herbs for a new twist on any flavor: Mint, Lavender, Thyme, Basil, Sage, Rosemary, Tarragon

Simply water
At the end of the day, regular old tap water–or at least a filtered version of it–seems to be the way to go.  I’m fortunate that St. Louis is considered to have some of the best tasting tap water in the U.S. I still prefer the taste of it filtered through a Brita Water Filter Pitcher–we’ve been using one for years. But, I still don’t drink enough water.

Aside from my morning coffee, I honestly forget to drink fluids throughout the day. I know that it’s important for my health. I don’t dislike water, but I do get kind of bored with it. That was the motivation for starting to make flavored waters.

Subtle flavor without sweetness
These aren’t sweet waters, so they’ll be disappointing if that’s what you’re expecting. This is water with subtle flavors infused into it. Water with a little something extra. A touch of flavor–not an explosion of flavor–with little or no sweetness. You’ve probably had pitchers of ice water with lemon served at restaurants. This is the same idea, but with more variety. Many spas serve fancy waters like these, and it turns out that they couldn’t be simpler to make. And, they are oh-so-refreshing.

How to make
Naturally Flavored Water

Supplies Needed:

  • fruit — whatever kind you like (except no bananas); make sure it’s good and ripe for maximum sweetness and flavor.  I like to use all kinds of citrus and berries. I also found pineapple and watermelon to work well for flavoring water. If you don’t want to buy whole ones, many grocery stores sell small containers of pre-cut fruit.
  • herbs — these are optional, but many herbs are a surprising complement to fruit flavors; almost any herb will work depending on your personal preference
  • jars or pitchers — I use 2 quart mason jars primarily, but any 2 quart pitcher will do.
    fruit infusion pitcher–I recently purchased one of these–it’s another option if you think you’ll be making infused waters regularly; a very easy, tidy way to strain fruit from water.
    fruit infusion water bottle–I love using this for a portable, on-the-go option.
  • muddler or wooden spoon for mashing fruit and herbs
  • water — I use filtered water, but regular tap water is fine if yours tastes good to you

 

Fresh vs. frozen fruit. When in season, I prefer to use fresh fruit. However, when fruit is out of season, the fresh version can be tart or flavorless. Because fruit that is to be frozen is picked at the peak of ripeness, it is often the better option for the best flavor, sweetness, and nutrients. I find this to especially to be the case with berries and peaches.

A variety of fresh herbs. Use whatever herbs you like or happen to have on hand. I picked all of these from my herb garden and have tried them in flavored waters. It’s surprising how well they blend with most fruit flavors, and they amp up the refreshing factor of the water. Mint is the most obvious herb choice. I also have tried basil, rosemary, sage, thyme, lavender, and tarragon. All good.

 

Fresh vs. frozen fruit. When in season, I prefer to use fresh fruit. However, when fruit is out of season, the fresh version can be tart or flavorless. Because fruit that is to be frozen is picked at the peak of ripeness, it is often the better option for the best flavor, sweetness, and nutrients. I find this to especially to be the case with berries and peaches.

A variety of fresh herbs. Use whatever herbs you like or happen to have on hand. I picked all of these from my herb garden and have tried them in flavored waters. It’s surprising how well they blend with most fruit flavors, and they amp up the refreshing factor of the water. Mint is the most obvious herb choice. I also have tried basil, rosemary, sage, thyme, lavender, and tarragon. All good.

 

I’ll share some of the fruit and herb combos that I’ve recently tried for flavoring water. But, honestly, you can combine most fruits and herbs according to your favorite flavors and what you have on hand in your fridge. I’ll show you how to make 5 flavor combos. You can take it from there, creating endless flavor combos of your own.

Quantities: The quantities in my flavored water recipes are all for 2 quart jars or pitchers. However, I ran out of the 2 quart jars and used a few 1 quart jars, halving the recipe ingredients. So, don’t be confused by the different jar sizes. It’s easy to make a full or half batch depending on your jar or pitcher size.

The first 2 waters are
flavored with fruit only (no herbs)
WASH FRUIT THOROUGHLY! The citrus and berries need to be really, really clean to keep contaminants and bacteria out of your flavored water. I recommend organic fruit, if it isn’t going to be peeled.

  1. All Citrus Flavored Water(adds refreshing tartness to water) — slice 1 orange, 1 lime, 1 lemon into rounds, then cut the rounds in half. Add to jar, press and twist with a muddler or the handle of a wooden spoon. Press enough to release some of the juices, but don’t pulverize the fruit into pieces. Fill the jar with ice. Pour in water to the top. Stir it with the handle of a wooden spoon or a chopstick. Put a lid on it, put it in the fridge, and chill.
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