When Is Chinese New Year 2017?

2017 Is a Rooster Year!

  • Roosters” are hardworking, resourceful, courageous, and talented…

Read more on the personality, career, and love life for Rooster year people, and other Chinese zodiac traits by clicking on the links in the table below.

Chinese New Year Dates from 2017 to 2027

Year Chinese New Year Date Day of the week Zodiac Animal
2016 February 8 Monday Monkey
2017 January 28 Saturday Rooster
2018 February 16 Friday Dog
2019 February 5 Tuesday Pig
2020 January 25 Saturday Rat
2021 February 12 Friday Ox
2022 February 1 Tuesday Tiger
2023 January 22 Sunday Rabbit
2024 February 10 Saturday Dragon
2025 January 29 Wednesday Snake
2026 February 17 Tuesday Horse
2027 February 6 Saturday Goat

Experience Chinese New Year with China Highlights

How Long Is Chinese New Year Holiday?

The Official Holiday — 7 Days

The standard public holiday for (Mainland) Chinese is the 7 days from Chinese New Year’s Eve to day 6 of the lunar calendar new year (January 27 – February 2, 2017).

(China Highlights will be officially on holiday during this period, and back at work on Friday, February 3, though you can still reach our 24/7 hotline numbers, and on-duty travel advisors.)

Officially only the first three days of Chinese New Year are statutory holiday. Chinese must work the two weekend days closest to the statutory holiday to “make up the work time”.

The Most Important Dates of Chinese New Year

  • Chinese New Year’s Eve: the day of family reunions
    On a Chinese calendar: 除夕 Chúxī /choo-sshee/ ‘getting-rid-of evening’
  • Chinese New Year’s Day: the day of (close) family visits and New Year greetings
    On a Chinese calendar: 初一 Chūyī /choo-ee/ ‘first 1’
Chinese Calendar Date New Year’s Eve New Year’s Day Month 1 Day 2 Month 1 Day 3 Month 1 Day 4 Month 1 Day 5 Month 1 Day 6
2017 Date Jan. 27 Jan. 28 Jan. 29 Jan. 30 Jan. 31 Feb. 1 Feb. 2
Day Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

How to Make Good Luck in Your Zodiac Year — Roosters Beware in 2017!

Getting Good Luck in a Zodiac Year — Wearing Red

According to Chinese tradition, there are some things that people can do to fend off bad luck in a zodiac year.

By Wearing Red — Drive Away Bad Luck

Wear red clothes.

Red is one of the luckiest colors in Chinese culture, standing for prosperity, loyalty, success, and happiness. Red can drive away bad luck and evil spirits.

Therefore wearing red during your zodiac year (or zodiac year) will bring you good luck and give you a good year. You can wear a red belt, red socks, red shoes, or red clothes, and red underwear is highly recommended during your zodiac year.

However, there is a rule that you need to pay attention to, or the red won’t ward off bad luck. You cannot buy, for example, the red underwear yourself. It should be bought by a spouse, family member, or friend.

By Wearing Jade Accessories

Besides wearing red, you can also wear jade accessories during your zodiac year to ward off bad luck, like pendants, earrings, rings, and bracelets.

Chinese New Year Food: Top Lucky Foods and Symbolism

Chinese New Year food

Fish — an Increase in Prosperity

steamed fish

In Chinese, “fish” (鱼 Yú /yoo/) sounds like ‘surplus’. Chinese people always like to have a surplus at the end of the year, because they think if they have managed to save something at the end of the year, then they can make more in the next year.

The Meaning of Various Fish

What fish should be chosen for the New Year feast is based on auspicious homophonics.

  • Crucian carp: As the first character of ‘crucian carp’ (鲫鱼 jìyú /jee-yoo/) sounds like the Chinese word 吉 (jí /jee/ ‘good luck’), eating crucian carp is considered to bring good luck for the next year.
  • Chinese mud carp: The first part of the Chinese for “mud carp” (鲤鱼 lǐyú /lee-yoo/) is pronounced like the word for gifts (礼 lǐ /lee/). So Chinese people think eating mud carp during the Chinese New Year symbolizes wishing for good fortune.
  • Catfish: The Chinese for “catfish” (鲶鱼 niányú /nyen-yoo/) sounds like 年余 (nián yú) meaning ‘year surplus’. So eating catfish is a wish for a surplus in the year.
  • Eating two fish, one on New Year’s Eve and one on New Year’s Day, (if written in a certain way) sounds like a wish for a surplus year-after-year.
  • If only one catfish is eaten, eating the upper part of the fish on New Year’s Eve and the remainder on the first day of the new year can be spoken with the same homophonic meaning.

There are some rules related to the position of the fish.

  • The head should be placed toward distinguished guests or elders, representing respect.
  • Diners can enjoy the fish only after the one who faces the fish head eats first.
  • The fish shouldn’t be moved. The two people who face the head and tail of fish should drink together, as this is considered to have a lucky meaning.
  • Fish can be cooked in various ways such as boiling, steaming, and braising. The most famous Chinese fish dishes include steamed weever, West Lake fish with pickled cabbage and chili, steamed fish in vinegar sauce, and boiled fish with spicy broth.

Chinese Dumplings — Wealth

With a history of more than 1,800 years, dumplings (饺子 Jiǎozi /jyaoww-dzrr/) are a classic Chinese food, and a traditional dish eaten on Chinese New Year’s Eve, widely popular in China, especially in North China.

Chinese dumplings can be made to look like Chinese silver ingots (which are not bars, but boat-shaped, oval, and turned up at the two ends). Legend has it that the more dumplings you eat during the New Year celebrations, the more money you can make in the New Year.

Dumplings generally consist of minced meat and finely-chopped vegetables wrapped in a thin and elastic dough skin. Popular fillings are minced pork, diced shrimp, fish, ground chicken, beef, and vegetables. They can be cooked by boiling, steaming, frying or baking.

How they’re made: Almost all Chinese people can make dumplings. First they mix the dough, second make the dough into round “wrappers” with a rolling pin, third fill the wrappers with stuffing, fourth pinch the “wrapper” together into the desired shape, and fifth cook them.

Different Dumpling Fillings Have Different Meanings

Chinese don’t eat Chinese sauerkraut (酸菜 suāncài /swann-tseye/) dumplings at Spring Festival, because it implies a poor and difficult future. On New Year’s Eve it is a tradition to eat dumplings with cabbage and radish, implying that one’s skin will become fair and one’s mood will become gentle.

How to Make LUCKY Dumplings

  • When making dumplings there should be a good number of pleats. If you make the junction too flat, it is thought to purport poverty.
  • Some Chinese put a white thread inside a dumpling, and the one who eats that dumpling is supposed to possess longevity. Sometimes a copper coin is put in a dumpling, and the one who eats it is supposed to become wealthy.
  • Dumplings should be arranged in lines instead of circles, because circles of dumplings are supposed to mean one’s life will go round in circles, never going anywhere.

Spring Rolls — Wealth

Spring rolls

Spring rolls (春卷 Chūnjuǎn /chwnn- jwen/)  get their name because they are traditionally eaten during the Spring Festival. It is a dish especially popular in East China: Jiangxi, Jiangsu, Shanghai, Fujian, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Hong Kong, etc.

Spring rolls are a Cantonese dim sum dish of cylindrical-shaped rolls filled with vegetables, meat, or something sweet. Fillings are wrapped in thin dough wrappers, then fried, when the spring rolls are given their golden-yellow color.

Lucky Saying for Eating Spring Rolls

黄金万两 (hwung-jin wan-lyang/): ‘A ton of gold’ (because fried spring rolls look like gold bars) — a wish for prosperity.

Glutinous Rice Cake — a Higher Income or Position

Chinese New Year cakesChinese New Year cakes

In Chinese,  glutinous rice cake (年糕 Niángāo /nyen-gaoww/) sounds like it means “‘getting higher year-on- by year”‘. In Chinese people’s minds, this means the higher you are the more prosperous your business is a general improvement in life. The main ingredients of niangao are sticky rice, sugar, chestnuts, Chinese dates, and lotus leaves.

Lucky Saying for Eating Niangao

年年高 (niánnián gāo /nyen-nyen gaoww/): ‘Getting higher year-after-year by year’, can imply children’s height, rise in business success, better grades in study, promotions at work, etc.

Sweet Rice Balls — Family Togetherness

Chinese New Year foodSweet rice balls

Sweet rice ball (汤圆 Tāngyuán /tung-ywen/) is the main food for China’s Lantern Festival, however, in south China, people eat them throughout the Spring Festival. The pronunciation and round shape of tangyuan are associated with reunion and being together. That’s why they are favored by the Chinese during the New Year celebrations.

Lucky Sayings for Eating Tangyuan

团团圆圆 (Tuántuán yuányuán /twann-twann ywen-ywen/ ‘group-group round-round’): Happy (family) reunion!

Longevity Noodles  — Happiness and Longevity

Chinese noodles

Longevity noodles (长寿面 Chángshòu Miàn /chung-show myen/) unsurprisingly symbolize a wish for longevity. Their length and unsevered preparation are also symbolic of the eater’s life.

They are longer than normal noodles and uncut, either fried and served on a plate, or boiled and served in a bowl with their broth.

Good Fortune Fruit — Fullness and Wealth

Certain fruits are eaten during the Chinese New Year period, such as tangerines and oranges, and pomeloes. They are selected as they are particularly round and “golden” in color, symbolizing fullness and wealth, but more obviously for the lucky sound they bring when spoken.

Chinese New Year fruitsChinese New Year fruits

Eating and displaying tangerines and oranges is believed to bring good luck and fortune due to their pronunciation, and even writing. The Chinese for orange (and tangerine) is 橙 (chéng /chnng/), which sounds the same as the Chinese for ‘success’ (成). One of the ways of writing tangerine (桔 jú /jyoo/) contains the Chinese character for luck (吉 jí /jee/).

Eating pomeloes/shaddocks is thought to bring continuous prosperity. The more you eat, the more wealth it will bring, as the traditional saying goes. The Chinese for pomelo (柚 yòu /yo/) sounds like ‘to have’ (有 yǒu), except for the tone, and exactly like ‘again’ (又 yòu).

 

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